"Keith"

The Easter Eggs of the Disney Resorts

If you haven’t been down to the Walt Disney Resort around Easter time, you probably never knew that the pastry chefs at the Grand Floridian create massive chocolate Easter Eggs for display in the resort.  I’ve also seen eggs over in the 4th floor of the Contemporary in past years.  This is the 7th year that the eggs have been on display.

You can see a video of how they are made from an older Disney Parks Blog post here.

Team member, and all around great guy, Ben Hendel got a chance to walk through the eggs over at the Grand Floridian to capture some great images of the eggs this year.  Photographing the eggs can be a bit tricky!  There is always a crowd looking at the wonderful creations so you really have to consider your composition to pull off a good shot.   Thanks to Ben for getting the images of this year’s eggs!

 

Celebrate the circle of life with this Lion King themed Easter Egg.  I love all the details in the animals that are hanging off the side of the egg.

Even the villains get in on the Easter Egg action.  Notice how Ben used a shallow depth of field to blur out the background and put the focus on the egg.  

 

A new movie means an opportunity for a new themed egg for the pastry chefs at the Grand Floridian.  Here’s their Moana themed Easter Egg.  

App Update – On Sale this weekend only

Just a quick note about our Photo a Day app for iOS.  An update went live on the store fixing a bug where some past photos were not showing up correctly.  Our apologies for any inconvenience this may have caused our existing customers.  If you aren’t a customer already, what are you waiting for?  The price to drop?  Well then this is your lucky weekend.  The in app purchase that unlocks the photos for 2017 – that’s 365 images; a new one every day of the years – is now only $0.99 until Monday April 17th.  So if you’ve been on the fence, now is a perfect time to buy.  If you are looking for the App Store, you can follow the link here.  2017 Photo A Day from Disney Photography Blog underwent a bit of a name change because Apple said so – the app is now called Daily Magic from Disney Photography Blog.  If you already own the app – no worries, the app will update and you will never know the difference.

 

 

Wishes – Fireworks from the Ticket and Transportation Center

Recently I had to take a business trip down to Orlando. It was a last minute trip and I knew there was no way for me to get in to the parks…..but that doesn’t mean I wasn’t going to see Wishes in person one last time before it goes away on May 12th for Happily Ever After.  I’m a DVC member so I could have gone up to watch the fireworks from the top of Bay Lake Tower.  Or I could have watched them from the observation deck of the Contemporary.  I’ve watched Wishes from those locations before and but I’ve never tried watching the show from the TTC so I thought I would give that a shot.

First rule of fireworks photography.  PACK ALL OF THE GEAR YOU NEED!  Since this was an in and out trip to Orlando all I brought with me was the camera, tripod, and shutter release.  I left my Variable ND filter at hope (DOH!) and my hot shoe mounted bubble level (DOH!), but I did remember to bring my step up rings.  I didn’t even bother to bring all of my lenses.  All I had with me was the my 50mm f/1.8.

Watching Wishes from the TTC is great!  They pipe the music in and it’s not very crowded.  The only real problem is the ferry.  Once you get set up you have to guard your tripod set up from the crowds of people that are leaving the Magic Kingdom.  One small dive down the rabbit hole.  Who the heck leaves the Magic Kingdom right before the fireworks?!?!?!?!  The ferry’s were PACKED with guests streaming out of the park.  Don’t these people know that the show won’t be around for long?  And who hates fireworks?!?!??!?

Back to shooting the fireworks at the TTC.  First things first.  During the beginning of the show the Ferry is still running.  So you are going to get streaks of the Ferry running through your shot early on in the fireworks.

Second, 50mm f/1.8 is far too wide to shoot the fireworks.  Look at the lead image of this blog post.  The island on the left is so dark it acts as a dead spot in the photo.  You probably want something at least 85mm.

Third, like I said above.  Don’t forget all of your gear.  I’ve never shot fireworks without my ND filter.  Texting Cory right before the fireworks started, he told me to go with a smaller aperture.  By the time the finale got around I had dropped down all the way to f/18.  But I still left the shutter open too long.  Blow out city man!

If I were going to do the show again I would definitely remember to bring my variable ND filter and my hot shoe bubble level.  I know, I know.  My Canon 60D has an on screen digital level.  Trust me – the bubble level is much easier to use.

One other thing.  There was a relatively small group of people shooting from the TTC with me that night.  For the life of me I can’t imagine trying to shoot the fireworks in Bulb mode on your camera WITHOUT a remote shutter release.  Look there are tons of them here on Amazon and there are a lot of models under $10.  That’s all I spent on mine.  The camera is going to vibrate when you press the shutter.  It ruins the point of putting the camera up on a tripod.

I’m really happy I got to see Wishes in person one last time.  Wishes has a special place in my heart.  After seeing the teaser footage the new show and music could be really good, but it will never have the sentimental value of Wishes for me.  I didn’t nail the images as well as I hoped but I still got some keepers out of it so I’ll take that as a win.

PREVIEW

Do you like to go into the park with only your camera and one lens?  Would you like to have quick access to a second lens WITHOUT using a big bag in the park?  Well LensFlipper might be what you are looking for.  The team at LensFlipper sent us a review unit and Ben’s review is going to be up on Monday.  I’ve seen the review and you’ll definitely want to check back on Monday.

 

National Parks Announcement

Taking a quick break from Disney Photography news to make a bit of an announcement.

Friend of the blog Mark Willard is a great photographer who not only takes pictures of Disney Theme Parks, but travels across the US shooting pictures of National Parks and Cityscapes.  In light of recent events, Mark has decided to donate all the proceeds from sales of his National Parks landscape prints to the National Parks Foundation.  The foundation helps support the 400 US National Parks and helps preserve the nearly 84 million acres of public lands.

If you look through the gallery, you are going to see some amazing photographs.  Wouldn’t it be great hanging in your home or place of work?  Mark is a great guy so we encourage you to help support him in this truly noble gesture.  You can follow Mark on Twitter and see some of his amazing photos on Flickr as well.  Trust us, we’ve been trying to get Mark to write a blog post or two here.

 

 

Rivers of Light – Review (no spoilers)

Rivers of Light is a new evening show at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. It’s currently most famous for having been delayed quite a bit since the intended opening date of April 22nd, 2016. It began public “invite-only” soft-opening shows on February 10th for anybody with a FastPass+ reservations or is an Annual Passholder or DVC Member who is able to collect a wristband. It lasts approximately 18 minutes, and is filled with projections, water cannons, water misters, boats, and floats.

I’ve seen it described by some as a longer version of the intermission scene of IllumiNations: Reflections of Earth, where the globe floats to the center of World Showcase Lagoon. This is not an inaccurate description, but also not an entirely accurate one either. It joins nighttime rides on Kilimanjaro Safaris, Tree of Life projection shows, and the soon-to-be-opened Pandora: World of Avatar (which itself opens on May 27th, 2017) in expanding Animal Kingdom’s evening offerings. Like the Tree of Life projection shows, it does require you to bring some interpretation with you; it’s not always 100% clear what Disney is trying to get across. That last point, however, is one of the things I really like about Rivers of Light. Different people will see different things in it, and that’s fantastic.

There are no fireworks in Rivers of Light, which is necessitated by all of the animals in such close proximity to the performance area. But do not let the fact that this isn’t a Disney Nighttime Spectacular (TM) steer you away from Rivers of Light, it is still well worth viewing. The folks over at Walt Disney Creative Entertainment, and I imagine also Walt Disney Imagineering, have perfected projection technology on water. Moreover, they’ve been able to project on multiple mediums of water; there are heavy-mist “screens” in the back of the performance area, smaller spheres of mist that move around during the show, and finally greater areas of fog that are used to show moving images.

Floating lotuses and gigantic, illuminated animal floats join two boats, a “warm” red boat, and a “cold” blue one dance a beautifully choreographed dance around the Discovery River, supplemented by beautiful music and four live performers, two on each boats. One of each of those performers is designated the Teacher, and they help tell the story of Rivers of Light along with spirits of tigers, owls, elephants, and turtles, supplemented by projections and dancing jets of water that seem as if someone said “Have you seen the show in front of the Bellagio in Las Vegas? We’d like to do that, but we want the foundations for the show to float on top of a lake and move autonomously.” It’s a remarkable thing, to be sure.

I quite enjoyed the show and the message behind it. It is a show that, photographically, rewards wide shots and tight shots, but not too much in between. Discovery River is gigantic, and the floats and boats use every inch of water that they can. As a result, things are very wide left-to-right, but not so much top-to-bottom. Be prepared to crop your shots if there’s a boring sky. Telephoto lenses will not suffer from this so much, but they’ll miss the scale and breadth of everything together. That isn’t a bad thing, however, as the floats and performers are so incredibly detailed that to not capture them close-up would be a crime.

Overall, I really enjoyed Rivers of Light. I did not take a lot of pictures during this soft open show as I truly wanted to experience the show fully, and I find I cannot do that with my eye up to a viewfinder. In doing so, I learned that this is a show I will keep coming back to, even without my camera, because there is so much going on that one truly cannot see it all during a single viewing. Thankfully, with a rumored three shows an evening during summer operating hours, 15,000 people a night will be enjoying Rivers of Light. It appears roughly half of those seats are reserved for FastPass+, so there are lots of opportunities to watch. I hope you take advantage of them, because it’s a show unlike any other on property. The soundtrack is amazing without being an earworm that sticks with you for months (I’m looking at you, Boo To You) and the technology and details are incredible.

Editor’s Note: Thanks Ben for going to the preview and giving us a taste of what the show looks like.  Extra special thanks for no spoilers. I can’t wait until the next time I can go to WDW to see the new show.