Merged

Working in Layers – Symphony in the Stars Edition

I have had Adobe Photoshop Creative Cloud for Photographers for a little over two years now.  For me, the $9.99 per month ($7.99 from this Amazon link) is a bargain.  A buddy of mine is a 3D artist and has always been my go-to resource for getting help in Photoshop, but back when I was using Photoshop Elements (a program I was getting every year for the latest features) I would always stumble into something where Rob would try explaining something to me only to find that those commands / feature wasn’t available in Elements.

I know I’ve said it here before but I’ll say it again and a thousand times more.  I wish I wrote stuff down while I was in the parks or followed a checklist.  I knew exactly what shot I wanted to get of Symphony of the Stars.  I knew that the lights along the Hollywood Boulevard would be dimmed during the fireworks, so I was going to need a “plate” image when the lights were still on.  I knew that’s what I wanted to do, but I was still too dumb the first time I shot the fireworks to shoot a bracket of the image you see above.  What in the world was I thinking?  I was set up in my spot (just before the Sunset Boulevard intersection) thirty minutes before the show started and had plenty of time.  I just completely spaced it out.  Anyway, I was able to get a decent plate image (shown below).

Plate

I brought the raw image into Photoshop and made all of the adjustments I wanted.  Then I shot the fireworks as normal.  Remember when you are shooting a plate like this, you need to keep the camera in exactly the same spot without moving.  This is a concept I can completely understand.  But do you see those really tall, really skinny trees lining Hollywood Boulevard?  Those things are going to move on you, and sometimes they are going to move too much for this kind of merge technique to work.  It was pretty windy that night so they moved a lot on me.  Luckily there were several shots that things worked out ok.

Fireworks

So the above image is one of the fireworks shots.  Again, I opened it up in Photoshop and made all of my adjustments.  Then I selected Layer -> Duplicate Layer and told Photoshop to add it to the original image as a new layer.  And when you look at the combined image, initially it looks EXACTLY the image above.  But wait, there’s more Photoshop trickery to be had!   To get the image at the top of the post you have to change the blend mode for the layers.  There are a lot of choices, but what we want is Lighten.

Screen Shot 2016-05-30 at 2.06.41 PM

And Bam!  You get the image like the one at the top of the article or this other one here below.  I wish I had shot a bracket for my plate (and then I could merge it into an HDR image).  But such is life, maybe next time.

If you are going to be ordering from Amazon.com anyway, please consider following this link.  It doesn’t cost you anything but we earn a very small commission and it helps support the site.

DSC_2608

FoCal Lens Calibration Software

[Editor’s Note.  We hope everyone had an enjoyable three day weekend, and making sure to remember the men and women who gave their lives in service of our country.  Here’s another great piece by Ben Hendel, this time talking about an interesting bit of software used for calibrating your lenses.  You need to be following Ben on Instagram.  He got a chance to take two big lenses into Animal Kingdom recently and got some GREAT photos.  So jealous of the opportunity Ben had.  Thanks again Ben for the article! ].

 

High-end cameras cost a lot of money and you get a great product for them. Same thing goes with lenses. But what if I told you that if you just bolt your new-and-shiny lens to your new-and-shiny camera, that you aren’t getting everything you’ve paid for? Because of production variables and tolerances, not every camera and lens leaves the factory “perfect.” The camera body manufacturers know this, and they build in a way to fine-tune your camera body to your lenses. On my Nikon, this is called AF Fine-Tune, and is usually called AF Microadjustment (AFMA) on a Canon.

Disclaimer: NOT ALL CAMERAS SUPPORT THIS FEATURE. It is usually found in higher end models. My D7000 had it, my D60 did not. [Editor’s note, my Canon 60D does NOT have this feature. Guess that saves me from getting the FoCal software myself. Will keep this in mind for the next camera I get.]

Modern cameras can hold multiple lens profiles. As you can see, my camera can hold 12 different adjustment values in memory, each one tied to a particular lens. If you have more than 12 lenses, well, you’re richer than I am. Spread the wealth, eh? I accept PayPal. If you rent a lot of lenses, you may want to keep half an eye on how many values you’re storing and clear them out occasionally. I know I need to do that with the values from tuning the Sigma 150-600mm.

Photo May 26, 8 38 13 PM

In the past, this has been a manual process. You’d set up a target, take a picture, and decide whether you were back-focusing (your actual focus-point is behind where you wanted it to be) or front-focusing (just the opposite of back-focusing). Then, you’d dial in a setting that reflected this, and compare the images to see if it was better or worse. Repeat until you found a value you liked, or until you gouged out both of your eyes with a used grapefruit spoon.

However, there is now a company in the UK called Reikan who makes a wonderful piece of software called FoCal.

Double disclaimer: Reikan did not contact any member of the Disney Photography Blog and ask us to write this review. We were not provided with a free piece of software, and we are not compensated in any manner by Reikan or any company because of this review. Got it? Good.

FoCal is a piece of software that makes automatically calibrating your camera body to your camera lenses, so long as you shoot Nikon or Canon. And even then, not all cameras are supported by FoCal. To see if your body is supported, please visit this website: http://www.reikan.co.uk/focalweb/index.php/why/camera-compatibility/ . Even then, if you shoot Nikon, automatic calibration mode is not supported. This shouldn’t steer you away from the software, but it may save you a couple bucks not buying the super powerful full-featured edition when some of those fancy features don’t work for your camera.
First, you’ll need to set up a target. FoCal provides you with a PDF to print out, and recommends you print it on good card stock instead of plain white office paper. They say that ink bleeds into office paper too much, and this prevents FoCal from getting sharpness readings right. Once you’ve set up your target an appropriate distance away, you set your camera up on a tripod and go through the most frustrating process for me. When choosing where to place your target (mine is on the back of the front door of my house so I can use the long hallway to calibrate long lenses), you’ll want to choose an area with a lot of light. Alternatively, you can just have a 3 D-cell MagLight hanging around and point it at the target while FoCal is doing its thing. Don’t judge me. It works.
Screen Shot 2016-05-26 at 8.34.55 PM

I hate aiming the camera at the target. It must be aimed just-so, and I always tend to overshoot when adjusting the ballhead on my tripod. It also likely doesn’t help that most of the lenses I’ve calibrated recently are super-telephotos, and so I’m halfway across my house, trying to aim at a 2.5 inch center, with a heavy lens-and-camera combination.

That’s the hardest bit. FoCal will tell you when it is happy about your aim, and from there, does the vast majority of the work for you. Frankly, on a Canon, it likely does all the work for you. It takes pictures, changes the AFMA automatically, compares the shots, and repeats until it dials in the sharpest, most accurate possible autofocus value. If you’re shooting a Nikon, it’s a little bit more user-interactive. FoCal still takes pictures for you, and it still compares them for you, but you’ll have to adjust the AF Fine-Tune value on your own. Be gentle when you do, because if you nudge the camera off the target-point, your comparison data will be useless and you’ll have to start over.

Screen Shot 2016-05-26 at 8.40.02 PM
There is a fantastic amount of data that FoCal gives you while it is working. This particular lens required very little adjustment. It only required a +1 Fine Tune in order to be considered sharp and accurate. I’ve had other lenses that live in the +17 to +19 realm like my Nikon 80-200mm f/2.8. Before FoCal, I could focus on the nose of a Princess during a parade and “miss” focus because the lens was back-focusing so much. Adjusting that lens made a world of difference.
Screen Shot 2016-05-26 at 8.44.44 PM

After about 5 minutes of actual work, FoCal said it was done. It gave me a new value, and a lovely set of charts to go with them. I set that value in my AF Fine-Tune menu, and was ready to go for a day of shooting. There is also the option to Save Reports of what your lens correction looked like. I’ve attached, via links at the bottom of this review, those reports from the Sigma 150-600mm and the Nikon 200-500mm so you can see a little bit more of the data that FoCal can produce for you.

This is software I highly recommend, for anybody who is serious about getting the absolute most out of their camera and lenses. Whenever I get a new lens, the first thing I do is calibrate it. I’ll never miss another shot because my lens doesn’t understand what my camera body means by “in focus.”

Here are is a link to what the report looks like that FoCal generates.
Sigma 150-600:  150-600mm f_5-6.3_600mm
Nikon 200-500: 200-500mm f_5.6_500mm

Bird

Sigma 150-600 Lens Review

[Editor’s Note: Today’s article comes from frequent contributor Ben Hendel – @wdw_ben about renting and using the Sigma 150-600 lens.  Having shot the Canon 400mm f/2.8 lens before at a High School football game, I can only imagine what it must have been like to lug a lens that long into Animal Kingdom.  But if I did have access to that lens, you bet your bottom dollar Animal Kingdom would be the place to shoot it at.  I’ve seen people at my local zoo with monster lenses like this one and I’ve always wanted to try that out.]

A few weekends ago I went to an airshow in Fort Lauderdale featuring some of the best jet teams in the world. Because of this, and some travel I have planned in the future, I wanted to bring along a super-telephoto lens to test before spending thousands on one. I had done a fair amount of research, and I settled on renting the Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Sport, shot on a full-frame Nikon D610. This lens does work on a crop sensor camera, however, your effective range is 225-900mm, with an effective aperture of roughly f/7.7-10. This does mean you can see into Wednesday two weeks from now, but you’ll need a lot of light to do so.

The Sigma is a beast! Weighing in at 6.5 pounds, it is a hefty lens for which you’ll want a tripod or monopod if you plan on using it for more than a few hours. But with that weight comes a lot of glass. The reach of this lens is incredible. Never having owned a lens with a focal range of over 120mm (my Nikon 80-200mm), having 450mm of range was useful. That being said, I mostly rented this lens for it’s ability to be pushed all the way out to 600mm and remain tack sharp. Fair warning, though, I did spend a night calibrating the lens to my camera using FoCal’s wonderful calibration software. [Editor’s note, I’ve talked Ben into contributing a future article about calibrating your lenses.]

DSC_2548

On a practice day in Disney’s Animal Kingdom the day before the airshow, I had a ton of success getting pictures I could only dream of beforehand. I spent a ton of time on both walking trails and walked away with a ton of keepers, especially on the animals most people want to see especially: the tigers and gorillas. The sharpness of this lens was incredible after calibration. When I zoom in on the eye of the tiger (I will not sing, I will not sing, I will not sing…) [Editor’s Note – I am now singing this for you.] , I am able to see the blue sky and even some white clouds reflected back at me. The bird houses were incredibly interesting, especially because the weaver birds were busy building little houses. I was able to get clear shots of any bird I wished, when they stopped flying around, that is! Tracking a subject at 600mm is a chore, but that’s not a flaw in the lens, that’s just being really, really tight. I quickly developed a technique at the airshow of being pulled all the way out to 150mm to acquire and begin tracking a jet, then pushing in to 600mm (or as close as I wanted to zoom) to set up for the shot I was looking to take. I did not take this lens on Kilimanjaro Safaris as it would have lead to a fantastic black eye and terrible photos.

Tiger

One thing to note, when it game to objects in motion, especially at the 600mm end of this lens, fast moving objects are incredibly tough to frame, even once you’ve acquired them. Flittering finches and fast moving (we are talking miles an hour measured in the multiple hundreds) jets don’t stay in your viewfinder long if you’re not panning. And panning this lens is a chore. I recommend, if you’re worried about framing, pull out 15 to 25 millimeters and firing in a “spray and pray” manner. A less tight shot will allow you more freedom after the fact to crop and adjust your framing. This was a tip passed along to me by Don Sullivan (@donsullivan, check out his incredible photography) and I am passing it along to you. For shots like the tiger and gorilla, I was able to work more slowly and properly frame before pulling the shutter.

In the category of “ooooh, that’s a nice feature” is the tripod collar. The downside is that this behemoth of a collar does not detach. It also has three different screw bosses in it, so you can balance it on basically any camera and tripod combination. That means the foot of the collar is huge. However, it does have a fantastic little “click” to it when you’ve hit 0, 90, 180, and 270 degrees rotation with the lens. It’s a nice surprise so you know you’re locking in your camera at one of those points, and if you’ve leveled the camera on your tripod properly with one of those markers, the others will also be level if you are spinning it from portrait to landscape, or back again.

burner

This lens has a lot of upside. It’s incredibly sharp, it’s very accurate when focusing, and it’s reasonably priced for a super-telephoto lens. What does reasonably priced mean? The Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Sport will lighten your wallet by 20 pictures of Benjamin Franklin – $2,000. This sum of money gets you a lens, a shoulder carrying case for it (no picture of that, I’m sorry), and a heck of a bayonet that screws on to the front of the lens. It also screws on backward for transportation. There is no lens cap to speak of, but it does come with a nylon-like cover that Velcros around when the bayonet is stored backwards, with a little cutout for the thumb screw. This lens also supports Sigma’s USB Dock for Lens Calibration and firmware updates, however, it is not included. That’ll set you back an extra $59.

Formation

My biggest issue with this lens is the weight. I understand that in order to get good, sharp, super-telephoto glass you’re looking at weight. But all in, with a 1.5 pound camera strapped to the back of it, I had a package weighing 8 pounds that I was swinging back and forth on a beach in Fort Lauderdale for four hours. Monday was rough, I’ll say that much. My other big issue is that at 600mm, you get some crazy vignetting in your corners. While not noticeable on the camera’s LCD, they are prominent once loaded into a program like Lightroom. Thankfully, Lightroom contains automatic lens profile corrections for this lens, and that takes care of the corners quickly. When editing, it is the first thing I do to any photo before diving into deeper corrections. Finally, this lens does not accept teleconverters. Why you would want one is up to you (maybe you really do need a 300-1200mm lens for photographic the Church on the Blood from Nome), but this is a point to a lens I’m renting later this month.

Overall, I really liked this lens. It’s reach is fantastic, it’s fast for the price, the price is very reasonable, and it doubles as good help for bicep curls. But that last part is the biggest downfall for me. It is an incredibly heavy lens, especially when you are pointing it at an upward angle all day, like at an airshow. I would say the vignetting was an issue, but that was quickly and easily corrected in Lightroom, so it’s more of an annoyance than anything else. I would rent it again, should I need the reach at an airshow and should my upcoming rental of the Nikon 200-500mm f/5.6 not meet my needs for a super telephoto.

Canadia

Author’s note: There is a Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Contemporary also on the market for less money and weight. I have not shot it, so for a review, I’d recommend Tom Bricker’s excellent review here: http://www.disneytouristblog.com/

[Editor’s Note: Thanks for contributing the article again Ben!  Always interesting stuff!]

MagicFireworksBlog2

Fireworks Friday

Here’s a post you won’t see every day from Disney Photography Blog…..a fireworks shot from aboard the Disney Magic.

On most Disney Cruises these days (I’m assuming since I’m not an expert) one of the days at sea features a Pirate Night.  The servers in the restaurants are decked out in pirate garb, there is a dance party out on deck, and a show featuring Captain Hook and Pirate Mickey.  It’s quite a blast.

Another part of the Pirate Night is a short fireworks show at sea.  You aren’t getting something like Wishes or Illuminations, but it is a fun little show.  If you get a chance to go on one of these cruises, you need to do better research than I did.

The Pirate Party takes place between the forward and mid-ships funnels and guests can watch the party / show from either Deck 9 or Deck 10.  I opted for Deck 10 since we would be up higher and there would be a clearer shot of the fireworks.

MagicFireworksBlog

Yes the Funnelvision screen is super blurry.  Only including the shot to illustrate where I was set up for the shots.  ProTip – don’t stand here.

As I was getting ready to set up for the show, I had it in my mind that I had seen the fireworks more forward of the ship.  To the right (or more properly starboard) side of the forward funnel.  So I set up on the port side of the ship (I wanted to get an image of the ship in the fireworks shots) and with my back to the midships funnel.  Well, either my memory was wrong or  I was seeing a doctored photo because I was only half right.  The fireworks were being shot off the starboard side of the ship, but they were behind me.

Shame on me for not doing better research.  I probably should have spent more time at the Disney Cruise Line Blog because I’m sure Scott has the right answer posted over there.  The fireworks are coming from behind the midships funnel, so to get any shots I had to quickly spin the camera around and shoot from there.  I don’t have a super wide lens so the shots only turned out so-so.  There was also a knucklehead iPad photographer trying to video tape the fireworks in front of me so I had to crop in and adjust the angle mid show to the moving / blurry white spot out of the images.  All in all though, I liked how the reflections appear in the windows.

Magic3

Shooting the fireworks on the ship is exactly like shooting them on land.  You’ll need a sturdy tripod, a remote shutter release, and in my opinion a good variable ND filter.  I don’t know why I was worried about this when I was planning the trip, but I was worried about the sway of the ship during the fireworks but it really wasn’t an issue at all.

If you are going to be ordering from Amazon.com anyway, please consider following this link.  It doesn’t cost you anything but we earn a very small commission and it helps support the site.